Autumn Myths: Why Leaves Change Color

Now that it is officially Fall, I decided to explore the different stories and myths associated with Autumn.  Fall is often associated with change and many stories revolve around this.

For most Native American tribes, Fall is a time of harvest as well as a time when the leaves change the color.  One Wyandot legend is told to explain why leaves have many colors in the Fall.

One time a deer and a bear fought a great battle in the land of the sky.  The Bear was full of pride and selfish; he often caused trouble among the Animals of the Great Council.   The Bear had seen the Deer crossing the rainbow bridge that led to the sky land.  He confronted the deer and demanded to know why the deer crossed over into the land where the little turtle lived.  He was angry and demanded many answers.  The Deer also grew angry and felt the Bear had no right to ask these questions.  Only the Wolf had that right.  Having had enough, the Deer decided it was time for the Bear to stop making trouble among the animals and that He would kill the Bear.  Both fought each other long and hard resulting in the Bear being torn up by the Deer’s antlers.

The other animals having heard the noise of the battle, came to investigate.  The Wolf traveled into the sky and stopped them.  Since all the animals obeyed him, both the Deer and the Bear fled.  As a result, the blood of the Bear dripped down from the Deer’s antlers onto the trees of the Lower World causing the leaves to be many-colored.  To this day when the leaves change to reds, browns, and yellows, it is said that the blood of the Bear has been thrown down again onto the trees of the Great Island.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This entry was posted on Saturday, September 30th, 2017 at 8:35 pm and is filed under All Posts. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.